Scene Partner® follows standard playwriting rules
to deliver amazing results!

Scene Partner uses advanced text to speech (TTS) technology to play your lines, your cues, or whole scenes to help you get offbook fast. You can even record your own voice, and the voices of your fellow cast members, and mix it with the TTS playback!

The remarkable script parsing and text to speech features of Scene Partner® are based on a couple of important rules for writing scripts.

  1. Character names, which precede their dialogue, must always be in ALL CAPS. If not, then Scene Partner will not know when your character’s lines begin. Character names must include at least three alphabetical characters. Character names that have less than three alphabetical characters will not be recognized by Scene Partner as a character name. If your Character Name has one or two letters, then add enough spaces after the name to equal at least three alphabetical characters. In these cases, please be sure to end the Character Name with a period or a colon.

    Like this:

    WALL
    In this same interlude it doth befall
    That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
    

  2. The character name must either be followed by a return (placing it on its own line) or followed by a period or colon (if it is on the same line as the character’s dialogue).

    Like this:

    WALL
    In this same interlude it doth befall
    That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
    

    or this:

    WALL. In this same interlude it doth befall
    That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
    

    or this:

    WALL: In this same interlude it doth befall
    That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
    

  3. The character name must be preceded by a return, by pressing the “enter” or “return” key before the character name.

    Like this:

    DEMETRIUS
    It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
    discourse, my lord.
    
    THESEUS
    Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.
    

    Not this:

    DEMETRIUS. It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
    discourse, my lord. THESEUS. Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.
    

  4. The character name should not begin with a numeral (1-9). Replace all numerals with the name for that numeral.

    Like this:

    FIRST SOLDIER 
    

    Not this:

    1ST SOLDIER
    

  5. If the author indicates that the character SHOUTS by placing a line in ALL CAPS, then this might be identified by Scene Partner as a separate character. SHOUTS should be changed to either “Sentence case” or “Lead Cap” format.

    Not this:

    FIRST SOLDIER 
    WHY ARE YOU SHOUTING?! 
    

    But this:

    FIRST SOLDIER 
    Why Are You Shouting?! 
    

  6. Lyrics that appear in musicals will often be formatted in “ALL CAPS.” This might result in some lyrics being identified as characters. In order for lyrics to be treated as lines of dialogue, they should be changed to either “Sentence case” or “Lead Cap” format.

    Not this:

    FIRST SOLDIER 
    WHY AM I SINGING? 
    

    But this:

    FIRST SOLDIER 
    Why Am I Singing? 
    

  7. Text that is not part of the character dialogue (e.g. stage directions, page numbers, headers, footers, action, shots and transitions) must be placed in parenthesis, unless you want them spoken as if they are Character lines.

    Like this:

    THESEUS
    Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.
    
    (Enter PYRAMUS.)
    

    Not this:

    THESEUS
    Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.
    
    Enter PYRAMUS.
    

  8. If your script contains formal Act and Scene designations, then these should be placed on separate lines. The designations may be in either “ALL CAPS” or “Lead Cap.” They should be followed by the name or number of the designation (such as One, 1 or I). Scene Partner also recognizes the term Prologue as an Act or Scene designation.
    WARNING: If your script has formal Act and Scene designations, but you do not place a formal designation at the beginning of the script, then Scene Partner will think your script begins where the first formal designation appears. As a result, you may lose all of the script that occurs prior to the first Act or Scene listing.

    Like this:

    ACT ONE
    SCENE ONE
    

Example 1 from A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

WALL
In this same interlude it doth befall
That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
And such a wall as I would have you think
That had in it a crannied hole or chink,
Through which the lovers, Pyramus and Thisby,
Did whisper often very secretly.
This loam, this rough-cast, and this stone, doth show
That I am that same wall; the truth is so:
And this the cranny is, right and sinister,
Through which the fearful lovers are to whisper.

THESEUS
Would you desire lime and hair to speak better?

DEMETRIUS
It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
discourse, my lord.

THESEUS
Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.

(Enter PYRAMUS.)

PYRAMUS
O grim-look'd night! O night with hue so black!
O night, which ever art when day is not!
O night, O night, alack, alack, alack,
 I fear my Thisby's promise is forgot!--
And thou, O wall, O sweet, O lovely wall,
That stand'st between her father's ground and mine;
Thou wall, O wall, O sweet and lovely wall,
 Show me thy chink, to blink through with mine eyne.

(WALL holds up his fingers.)

Thanks, courteous wall: Jove shield thee well for this!
But what see what see I? No Thisby do I see.
O wicked wall, through whom I see no bliss,
Curs'd be thy stones for thus deceiving me!

Example 2 from A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

WALL. In this same interlude it doth befall
That I, one Snout by name, present a wall:
And such a wall as I would have you think
That had in it a crannied hole or chink,
Through which the lovers, Pyramus and Thisby,
Did whisper often very secretly.
This loam, this rough-cast, and this stone, doth show
That I am that same wall; the truth is so:
And this the cranny is, right and sinister,
Through which the fearful lovers are to whisper.

THESEUS. Would you desire lime and hair to speak better?

DEMETRIUS. It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
discourse, my lord.

THESEUS. Pyramus draws near the wall; silence.

(Enter PYRAMUS.)

PYRAMUS. O grim-look'd night! O night with hue so black!
O night, which ever art when day is not!
O night, O night, alack, alack, alack,
 I fear my Thisby's promise is forgot!--
And thou, O wall, O sweet, O lovely wall,
That stand'st between her father's ground and mine;
Thou wall, O wall, O sweet and lovely wall,
 Show me thy chink, to blink through with mine eyne.

(WALL holds up his fingers.)

Thanks, courteous wall: Jove shield thee well for this!
But what see what see I? No Thisby do I see.
O wicked wall, through whom I see no bliss,
Curs'd be thy stones for thus deceiving me!
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